Waterjet Group

Welcome to the ultimate waterjet forum, WaterjetGroup.com!
This forum will give you access to participate in discussions and attain resources via our vibrant waterjet community . This discussion board is intended for any waterjet user but the majority of the moderators are associates of Flow International Corporation. We will attempt to make this community an unbiased source of information regarding general waterjet topic areas. If you are a registered Flow Waterjet customer and require in-depth product support, please visit FlowParts.com.

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: High tack surface coatings for polycarbonate?


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 9
Date:
High tack surface coatings for polycarbonate?
Permalink  
 


Hey everyone,

This is my first post here. I look forward to asking more questions, and eventually providing more answers on these boards. So here goes...

We commonly cut polycarbonate in thicknesses from 1/16" up to 3/8" thick. Often times the parts are required to be optically clear with no more than 1 blemish per square foot and that blemish cannot be more than 1/16" in diameter. The problem that we run into is that the normal surface coatings on polycarbonate do not adhere well enough to keep the parts protected after cutting. We know that using long lead-ins or leading in from the edge works well for parts with no internal holes or contours, but many of our parts have internal features. Does anyone know of a coating or a method to apply to polycarbonate to keep the surface coating intact after cutting?

I used to operate a laser and cut mirrored stainless steel plates from time to time. The high pressure nitrogen from the nozzle would blow the coatings off of the stainless and we had the same problem until we found a coating called LaserGuard. That stuff remained intact through cutting and was incredibly difficult to remove after cutting, but was worth it to keep the parts protected. As far as I know they don't make a coating for plastics, unfortunately.

Anyone have any ideas to try? Thanks in advance for any tips!



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 9
Date:
Permalink  
 

No one has ever run into this problem huh?

__________________
mnm


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 4
Date:
Permalink  
 

have you tried stacking a sacraficial sheet on top to protect the surface? you'll need to keep the material tight at the pierce point, don't let it just float on the surface or it just lifts off and allows the jet to sometimes "fog" the pierce point. slowest way, predrill the pierce points, if surface finish is critical.

__________________
mnm


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 4
Date:
Permalink  
 

have you tried stacking a sacrificial piece on top? material needs to be tight, secured to keep material so the water doesn't get between the parts and float the top sheet allowing water to fog the pierce points



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 9
Date:
Permalink  
 

My machine has an option for a drill head which pre-drills the pierce points, but we don't do enough of this type of work right now to justify owning it. We have tried the sacrificial sheet, but it still seems to blow the surface coating up pretty bad and get garnet under the coating.

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Please note, the views and recommendations expressed by employees of Flow or it's partners on this website do not necessarily represent those of Flow International Corporation. For more information on this site's Terms of Use , please visit the DXF Copyright and Community Guidelines pages.

Important: Do not upload any DXF's or images without permission unless they consist entirely of content you or your company created.

By clicking "Upload file", you are representing that this DXF or image does not violate the WaterjetGroup.com's forum's Terms of Use and that you own all copyrights to this file or have authorization to upload it.