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Post Info TOPIC: Cutting Alum.


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Cutting Alum.
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I have noticed after cutting a lot of Alum. .500 thick that it release what I believe to be a gas into the water. It clears the water up tremendously and also bubbles from the bottom for long periods of time. Does anyone have any input on this? Thanks for your help!



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Jody Smith


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I have noticed this behavior on our OMAX table as well, but it is not strictly on aluminum. My best guess is that because the material is thicker than what you may normally be cutting, it dwells for longer and disturbs the garnet on the bottom, pulling air along with it. It creates air pockets in the garnet that slowly work their way back out and creates that bubbling.

I highly doubt that the aluminum is actually creating any type of reaction, though if the magnesium in the kerf material was separated and exposed to water it would create gas. I just don't see that happening without some type of chemical reaction occurring.

Maybe someone with more knowledge has some better ideas, but thats my 2 cents.



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I have noticed this behavior on our OMAX table as well, but it is not strictly on aluminum. My best guess is that because the material is thicker than what you may normally be cutting, it dwells for longer and disturbs the garnet on the bottom, pulling air along with it. It creates air pockets in the garnet that slowly work their way back out and creates that bubbling.

I highly doubt that the aluminum is actually creating any type of reaction, though if the magnesium in the kerf material was separated and exposed to water it would create gas. I just don't see that happening without some type of chemical reaction occurring.

Maybe someone with more knowledge has some better ideas, but thats my 2 cents.



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Try lighting the bubbles......


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What you are seeing is carbon dioxide bubbles from the breakdown of the aluminum. When magnesium breaks down (all alum has some amount in it) it creates magnesium oxide and carbon dioxide. Put a Co meter near the surface and throw a handfull of garnet over the bubbles to pop them, watch the carbon dioxide meter shoot high numbers.

 

 

~~GC~~



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